Zika Guideline and Flu Update 2/9/16

February 9th, 2016

There is mounting evidence in the present outbreak of an association between Zika virus infection in pregnant women and microcephaly in their infants. CDC currently recommends the following for the protection of pregnant women and their babies:
• Pregnant women should postpone travel to countries where Zika virus transmission is occurring (see http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/zika-travel-information).
• If travel is unavoidable, then pregnant women should take rigorous precautions to avoid mosquito bites.
• Pregnant women who have traveled to countries where Zika virus transmission is occurring should be tested for Zika virus infection within 2–12 weeks after travel

Pregnant women who have sex partners that have traveled to countries where Zika virus transmission is occurring should abstain or use condoms during sex (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, and fellatio) for the duration of their pregnancies.

Anyone traveling to a country where Zika virus transmission is occurring should take the following precautions:
• Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
• Stay in places with air conditioning or that use window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.
• Sleep under a mosquito bed net if you are overseas or outside and not able to protect yourself from mosquito bites.
• Use insect repellents registered with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
• Treat clothing and gear with permethrin or purchase permethrin-treated items.
• Men who have traveled to an area of active Zika virus transmission who have a pregnant sex partner should abstain from sexual activity or consistently and correctly use condoms during sex (i.e., vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) for the duration of the pregnancy.
• Men who have traveled to an area of active Zika virus transmission who are concerned about sexual transmission of Zika virus to male or non-pregnant female sex partners might consider abstaining from sexual activity or using condoms consistently and correctly during sex. Couples considering this personal decision should take several factors into account.
• Most infections are asymptomatic, and when illness does occur, it is usually mild with symptoms lasting from several days to a week; severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon.

More information and resources are available at ISDH’s Zika virus web page: http://in.gov/isdh/26910.htm
Zika virus testing for Indiana residents is only available at CDC. Specimen submission must be authorized by the Indiana State Department of Health. Please contact Jen Brown, State Public Health Veterinarian, at 317-233-7272 or jenbrown@isdh.in.gov.

Infuenza: we continue to have regional activity; H1N1 dominant strain; Good vaccine to strains match!

Questions call Deb McMahan, MD

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